You Gotta Make Ricotta!

In a large pot, add citric acid solution to 1 gallon milk, mix thoroughly, and heat until 185-195 degrees F.

In a large pot, add citric acid solution to 1 gallon milk, mix thoroughly, and heat until 185-195 degrees F.

As soon as the curds and whey separate, turn off the heat. Allow to set undistrubed, for 10 minutes. Drain.

Enjoy! I made chocolate ricotta mousse with it. YUM!

Eddy and I still had about half a gallon of milk in our fridge when we picked up our CSA basket this past weekend. Guess what it came with? Another gallon of milk.

Eddy and I don’t drink a lot of milk, so when we find ourselves with excess milk, we turn it into cheese! This time, I used half a gallon of old milk and half a gallon of new milk to make whole milk ricotta.

Making ricotta is easy when using a recipe from Home Cheese Making by Ricki Carroll. If you’re a longtime reader of my blog, you know how much I love that book. It is my cheesemaking bible.

Here’s what you do:

  1. Dissolve 1 teaspoon citric acid in 1/4 cup cool water.
  2. In a large pot, add citric acid solution to 1 gallon whole milk. Mix thoroughly.
  3. Heat the milk to 185 to 195 degrees F. Do not boil. Stir often to prevent scorching.
  4. As soon as the curds and whey separate, turn off the heat. Allow to set undistrubed, for 10 minutes.
  5. Line a colander with butter muslin. Ladle the curds into the colander. Tie the corners of the muslin into a knot and hang the bag to drain for 20-30 minutes, or until the cheese has reached the desired consistency.
  6. Enjoy! If enjoying later, store in a covered container in the refrigerator. Cheese should last 1-2 weeks.

Pretty easy, huh? Don’t have citric acid or butter muslin? If you live in central Arkansas, head to The Fermentables. If you live in northwest Arkansas, go to The Home Brewery.

Next time you find yourself with excess milk, don’t throw it away. Make cheese with it!

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One response to “You Gotta Make Ricotta!

  1. http://thegreenhorns.wordpress.com/2010/09/21/preservation/

    thought you would be interested in this article on cultural food studies.

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