Green Travel: Devil’s Den State Park

Eddy jumping across Lee Creek.

Devil's Den State Park is famous for its caves, crevices, bluffs, and ravines.

We ran into this little guy during our hike.

Ferns growing along the crevice.

Devil's Den had to close its caves to protect bats from contracting White Nose Syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed over one million bats in the eastern U.S.

In September, Eddy and I celebrated our anniversary. We had long planned on spending our anniversary weekend in Fayetteville. We LOVE Fayetteville. Little Bread Company, Greenhouse Grill, Good Things Boutique, Fayetteville Farmers Market, Dickson Street Bookshop…. The list goes on.

Neither Eddy nor I follow football, so imagine our surprise when we found out that Razarbacks were playing Roll Tides on our anniversary weekend in Fayetteville. (Imagine our friends’ surprise when they learned that Eddy and I had no clue about the biggest game for the Razarbacks this season.)

Normally when we visit Fayetteville, Eddy and I stay with our friends, Molly and Jeremy. (Thank you, Molly and Jeremy! You guys rock!) But since it was our anniversary weekend, we decided to get our own place. The problem was Razarbacks were playing Roll Tides, and most hotels in Fayetteville were booked.

That’s when Eddy came up with a brillant idea. We’ll camp at the Devil’s Den State Park!

Devil’s Den State Park is a 2,500-acre state park located 26 miles south of Fayetteville, near West Fork, Arkansas. We chose to stay there because it is in the Lee Creek Valley of the Boston Mountains.

For the past several years, Arkansas’ environmentalists have been fighting to protect Lee Creek from being dammed by the River Valley Water District (RVWD). Eddy and I signed petitions and followed its development until we received word in August 2010 that RVWD withdrew its plan to dam the creek. Hooray! So, we decided to take advantage of this opportunity to go see beautiful Lee Creek that is no longer threatened.

In addition to Lee Creek, the Devil’s Den State Park is famous for its caves, bluffs, ravines, rock shelters, and crevices that provide an excellent habitat for hibernating bats. Unfortunately, the park had to close its caves in May 2009 to prevent bats from contracting White Nose Syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed over one million bats in the eastern U.S. Eddy and I love bats, so we were sad that we weren’t able to see them, but we understand and support the park’s decision.

I took several pictures when we were there. Enjoy!

And if you are thinking about traveling the Natural State, I highly recommend Devil’s Den State Park. Check it out!

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