Tag Archives: co2

Green Travel: Buy Carbon Offsets

I love to travel, but I hate to fly. Did you know that airplanes pump out more than 600 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) every year? That’s nearly as much CO2 as the African continent annually emits. No wonder flying has become, for many, climate change’s Public Enemy Number One.

Despite my aversion to flying, I find myself on a plane from time to time. Eddy and I recently flew to Charleston, South Carolina, to visit his family. We decided to buy carbon offsets to balance out our emissions (and to stop me from whining about all the CO2 emitted by our travel).

We bought our offsets from Carbonfund.org. Carbonfund.org is a nonprofit organization based in Silver Spring, Maryland, that provides carbon offsetting and greenhouse gas reduction options to individuals, businesses, and organizations. Carbonfund.org purchases and retires certified carbon offsets on behalf of its donors. Donors are given a choice of project type to which they may donate, including renewable energy, reforestation, and energy efficiency projects. Carbonfund.org is a member of the Chicago Climate Exchange and is a Founding Member of the American Carbon Registry.

Since this was our first time buying carbon offsets, I was bracing for a couple of hundred dollars to balance out emissions from our travel. Well, it cost us $13.89. Now, that’s affordable. I’ll let the readers guess to which project we donated.

I found buying carbon offsets to be easy and painless. I’ll continue to reduce my carbon footprint, but, as Carbonfund.org says, what I can’t reduce, I will offset.

Interested in offsetting what you can’t reduce? Visit www.carbonfund.org.

CO2 is NOT Cool

On December 7, the Environmental Protection Agency ruled that greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane endanger public health, thus subject to EPA regulation under the Clean Air Act. Whatever you may have heard from right wing wackos, the so-called “endangerment findings” do not apply to you exhaling CO2 while you breathe. (I actually read a letter to the editor claiming as such. ) The EPA ruling establishes a basis for the agency to move forward and propose future standards for regulating greenhouse gas emissions. The EPA made the ruling in response to the 2007 Supreme Court decision that found greenhouse gases as air pollutants to be covered by the Clean Air Act.

So, what does this mean for large emitters like power plants? Glen Hooks with the Sierra Club and Eddy Moore with the Arkansas Business Leaders for a Clean Energy Economy weigh in on the issue in this week’s Arkansas Times. Check it out!

One thing is certain: whether by the EPA or Congress, greenhouse gases will be regulated in the future. Period. Energy efficiency and clean energy will help the U.S. hedge against the risks associated with dirty old power, i.e., coal and oil. Call Senators Lincoln and Pryor today and tell them to support comprehensive climate change and energy legislation!

Phoenix Renewable Energy Breaks Ground for Its New Facility in Camden

Camden Mayor Chris Claybaker said Phoenix Renewable Energy is the first big real opportunity the city has had in the last ten years.

Camden Mayor Chris Claybaker said Phoenix Renewable Energy is the first big real opportunity the city has had in the last ten years.

Mike Ross said Phoenix will provide a domestic fuel source for electric plants and an environmentally friendly alternative to coal.

Mike Ross said Phoenix will provide a domestic fuel source for electric plants and an environmentally friendly alternative to coal.

Over four hundred people attended the event, including U.S. Senator Mark Pryor, Congressman Mike Ross, Ecological Conservation Organization, Audubon Arkansas, Repower America, and Sierra Club.

Over four hundred people attended the event, including U.S. Senator Mark Pryor, Congressman Mike Ross, Ecological Conservation Organization, Audubon Arkansas, Repower America, and Sierra Club.

Senator Pryor addressed the audience.

Senator Pryor addressed the audience.

Senator Pryor talked about the need for more clean energy jobs in Arkansas.

Senator Pryor talked about the need for more clean energy jobs in Arkansas.

Sam Anderson, CEO, Phoenix Renewable Energy, said that Europe's cap and trade made his business possible, and that the business community should be more positive about cap and trade.

Sam Anderson, CEO, Phoenix Renewable Energy, said that Europe's cap and trade made his business possible, and that the business community should be more positive about cap and trade.

Anderson credited the Obama administration's stimulus plan for making his business a practical idea.

Anderson credited the Obama administration's stimulus plan for making his business a practical idea.

The audience included several people with clean energy T-shirts and green jobs hard hats.

The audience included several people with clean energy T-shirts and green jobs hard hats.

Green shovels to break the ground for Phoenix's new carbon-neutral facility.

Green shovels to break the ground for Phoenix's new carbon-neutral facility.

Anderson, Pryor, Ross, Claybaker, and other officials break the ground.

Anderson, Pryor, Ross, Claybaker, and other officials break the ground.

The new facility will occupy the former site of International Paper plant that closed almost a decade ago.

The new facility will occupy the former site of International Paper plant that closed almost a decade ago.

Bill Saunders, a Sierra Club member, shakes hands with Sam Anderson, CEO, Phoenix Renewable Energy.

Bill Saunders, a Sierra Club member, shakes hands with Sam Anderson, CEO, Phoenix Renewable Energy.

Ken Smith, Executive Director, Audubon Arkansas, shakes hands with a clean energy supporter.

Ken Smith, Executive Director, Audubon Arkansas, shakes hands with a clean energy supporter.

The plant is expected to open within 16 to 20 months. It will employ up to 60 people and creat 450 jobs in timber, transportation, and other industries that would serve the plant.

The plant is expected to open within 16 to 20 months. It will employ up to 60 people and creat 450 jobs in timber, transportation, and other industries that would serve the plant.

Phoenix Renewable Energy has taken the first step in creating a greener South Arkansas. On Thursday, August 13, the company broke ground on a brand new 44 acre renewable energy plant in Camden, Arkansas. The event included 400 local business owners, citizens of Camden, and state and local officials.  On hand for the event were Sam Anderson, CEO, Phoenix Renewable Energy, Camden Mayor Chris Claybacker, U.S. Senator Mark Pryor, and Representative Mike Ross. Audubon Arkansas, Ecological Conservation Organization, Repower America, and Sierra Club attended the event as well.

A $180 million wood pellet plant will occupy the site of the former International Paper mill. The pellets produced by the facility will be shipped to Europe, where cap and trade forces the countries to burn pellets instead of coal to generate electricity.

The plant is expected to open within sixteen to twenty months. It will employ up to 60 people and create 450 jobs in timber, transportation and other industries that would serve the plant.

Anderson credited two things for the plant becoming a practical idea: changes in Washington, D.C., and cap and trade.

“I believe if it were not for the Obama administration’s stimulus plan (and) concept of a new economy, the business we’re about to engage in would not be possible,” he said.

Anderson said that Europe’s cap and trade made his business possible, and that the business community should be more positive about cap and trade.

Pryor praised Phoenix for creating clean energy jobs in south Arkansas. In his speech, Pryor recognized the need for creating more green jobs in Arkansas and pointed to the “Clean Energy” signs held by several audience members.

Stephen Walker, Phoenix director of development, said the plant will be carbon dioxide neutral, with the trees serving as an offset because of the CO2 they absorb before they are harvested. The plant will use wood pulp to make the pellets and slashwood, waste ordinarily left behind when trees are harvested, to help fuel the plant. Extra electricity generated at the plant will be sent into the electric grid.

The company plans to build four identical plants elsewhere in Arkansas.